The Monday Mix: Nov. 13 – 19, 2017

Monday Morning Mix

Headlines discussed at LNWM’s Monday meeting:

A tax reform bill narrowly passed the US House of Representatives, with 13 Republicans voting no.
US new housing starts rose 13.7% in Oct., highest level in a year, on hurricane rebuilding in the South.
Japan’s economy has grown for 7 quarters in a row (through Sept.), the longest expansion since 2001.
India’s government debt was upgraded by Moody’s (to Baa2) but remains less than investment-grade.
Russia agreed to restructure $3.15 billion of debt owed to it by Venezuela, on very favorable terms.

Disclaimer: Clicking on any of the above links will take you away from the Laird Norton Wealth Management web page and to the source page. While we believe the information in these articles is relevant, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness.

Community and Family: Seattle in the Photographs of Al Smith

Community

Pianist Palmer Johnson at Faurot’s Ballroom on Capitol Hill around 1939. Photo by Al Smith.
View towards Lake Union as Interstate 5 was being built in the 1960s. Photo by Al Smith.

Last night at the Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI), the excitement in the grand reception room was palpable. Museum donors gathered for a preview of Seattle on the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith, for which LNWM is very proud to be one of the sponsors, especially since our firm turns 50 this year and has grown over the decades along with Seattle. Thanks to Al Smith, we now have these fantastic images of an important, fascinating part of Seattle’s history, said Howard Giske, curator of photography at MOHAI. … Read More

#Future50NW: The Future Is Now, and It’s Younger than You Think

#Future50NW, Community

The following is a guest post by Leonard Garfield, Executive Director of the Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI).

Starting this Saturday, November 18, a special exhibit called Seattle On the Spot: The Photographs of Al Smith will take MOHAI visitors on a journey through the Central District in the mid-20th century, as seen through the distinctive documentary lens of a local photographer named Al Smith. Chronicling Seattle’s African American community, the local jazz scene and the life and the work of this unique artist, Smith’s pictures give a peek into a vibrant part of Seattle’s history and culture.

But there’s something more. Al Smith wasn’t just a photographer. He was a young innovator who received his first camera at the age of 12, worked his way around the world as a steamship steward as a young man, and spent his life following the ideas of his own curiosity. Fittingly, Seattle On the Spot’s last room will feature current images taken by young photographers from Creative Justice, NAAM Youth Curators from the National African American Museum and Photographic Center Northwest, examining the changing communities of Seattle through their own individual paradigms and originality.

What does this trip through Seattle’s past have to do with the future? Our history and culture have always been shaped by the young people of our region. And putting the spotlight on young people as we talk about the ideas, institutions and individuals that will define the Pacific Northwest over the next 50 years helps us understand what we can look forward to.

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The Monday Mix: Nov. 6 – 12, 2017

Monday Morning Mix

Headlines discussed at LNWM’s Monday briefing:

China will allow foreigners to buy controlling interest in Chinese banks, other financials; a historic move.
The longest US stock market rally in 14 years stalled on signs that corporate tax cuts may be delayed.
US junk bond prices fell to nearly 7-month lows, as rising yields on less-risky bonds attracted investors.
The European Union gave Britain two weeks to clarify how Brexit will affect current financial obligations.
US tax reform is facing resistance for many reasons, including adding $1.5 trillion to deficit over 10 years.

Disclaimer: Clicking on any of the above links will take you away from the Laird Norton Wealth Management web page and to the source page. While we believe the information in these articles is relevant, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness.